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Mid-Winters Eve Blog Hop Giveaway. Ends Dec 27th


Welcome to Mid-Winter’s Eve Blog Hop

December 21st  – December 27th (US ONLY)

Co-Hosted by I am a reader, not a writer and & Oasis For YA & The Daily Harrell 

There will be 5 winners for this Hop. And each winner will receive 5  books each.

Prize Pack is 5 Children’s books.

 

The Sorcerer’s Apprentic by Mary Jane Begin

 

Everything You Need To Know About Geography Homework

 

Everything You Need To Know About History Homework

 

 

Hayyim’s Ghost retold by Eric A. Kimmel

 

 

What’s Happening to Grandpa? By Maria Shriver

 

Must be a follower to enter this giveaway

Mandatory Entry: Follow this blog by clicking on Follow Blog via Email and leave your comments and email address for shipping contact. No email No contact.

To win more books please check out the other OVER 250 blogs taking part by clicking on the link below to enter more goodies.

http://iamareadernotawriter.blogspot.com/2011/10/mid-winters-eve-giveaway-hop.html 

This giveaway close at midnight on Tuesday, December 27th  and the winners will be selected at random.org and posted December 28th 

Entries – 95

 

Happy Holiday!

 

This Giveaway Has Ended!

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December 20, 2011 Posted by | Giveaway Hops | , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

The Legend of St Patrick – March 17th


St. Patrick’s given name was Maewyn Succat

Patrick was born in Britain in the year 387. His real name is Maewyn Succat. The name St. Patrick was given to him later in life by Pope Celestine. His parents, Calphurnius and Conchessa belonged to a high ranking Roman family. St. Patrick recorded most of the history of his life and his spiritual writings in the “Confessio” (Confession). St. Patrick also wrote letters to Coroticus. In this letter, he criticized a raid on Ireland conducted by Coroticus, a British chieftain. Several of Patrick’s converts were killed during the raid. The letter also shows St.Patrick’s resentment of the scornful attitude of British clergymen and nobility toward the Irish.

When he was 16, he was captured by pagan Irish raiders and sold into slavery to a chieftain named Meliuc in Antrim , Ireland. He spent his teen years and time alone as a shepard to tend to his master’s sheep. During this time, his spirituality awakened and his belief in God became strong. He would pray many times in a day. After 6 years being in slavery, he had a dream that he would find a ship to take him to freedom. He escaped to follow his dream. He had to travel about 200 miles before he found a ship ready to set sail.

He managed to return to his family and home. Although Patrick was born a British, he considered himself an Irish because it was in Ireland that he discovered God. He had another vision. This vision would take him back to Ireland to preach the Gospel later. After his escape, he visited the St. Martin’s monastry at Tours. He also visited the island sanctuary of Lerins. He placed himself under the guidance of a bishop named, St. Germain (Germanus). Patrick was promoted to priesthood later. He stayed in Britain for eighteen years. During those years, he was still haunted by memories of Ireland and would often speak of his experiences in Ireland with St. Germain. The Bishop, St. Germain recommended Patrick to the pope. Patrick requested to be sent to Ireland but was denied. Palladius was chosen instead. When Palladius died, Patrick was chosen to be sent to Ireland. He was called to Rome and made a Bishop by Pope Celestine in 432 before he went on his mission to Ireland. It was during that occasion that the name “Patercius” or “Patritius” was given to him. The name comes from two Latin words, “pater civium” meaning “the father of his people”.

He suffered many trials as a missionary in Ireland. St. Patrick was imprisoned by the Druids but managed to escape. There are also many legends which talks about the miracles and magical fights between him and the Druids. One of which is when he was confronted by a chieftain named Dichu. Dichu drew his sword to kill Patrick but could not do so because his arm became rigid until he declared himself obedient to St. Patrick. Dichu was overwhelmed by the miracle that he made a gift of a large sabhall (barn). This was the first sanctuary dedicated by St. Patrick.

Another legend St. Patrick is most known for is driving the snakes from Ireland. Some tales tell that he stood on a hill and used a wooden staff to drive the snakes into the sea and banished them forever from Ireland. Another legend says that the snake resisted. St. Patrick then tricked it into entering a small box and cast it into the sea. It is true that Ireland has no snakes.

However, he managed to win favor with the local kings later. He spent the next 28 years traveling across the countryside to spread the word of God. He could do this easily as he was fluent with the Celtic language. He succeeded in converting almost the entire population of the island.

Legend has it that St. Patrick would use the shamrock to explain the Trinity – Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The word “shamrock” comes from the Gaelic word “seamrog” (In irish, it means “summer plant”) meaning “trefoil” (three leafed) or “little clover”. In Arabia, it is called shamrakh. It was a sacred emblem in Iran and to the Persian triads. It is also a sacred plant among the Druids. Shamrock is the national flower of Ireland. Many Irish people wear a shamrock on St. Patrick’s Day. It is not the Irish national emblem. The harp has that honor. This explains the color green and shamrocks on St. Patrick’s Day. Today, if you do not wear green on St. Patrick’s Day, you will get pinched !!

St. Patrick died at Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland, on the 17 March, 461 A.D at the age of 76. He is believed to be buried in Downpatrick, County Down. This is why we celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on the seventeenth of March. St. Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland.

The first St. Patrick’s Day celebration in the United States was held in Boston in 1737. The largest St. Patrick’s Day parade is in New York City.

http://www.kiddyhouse.com/Holidays/StPat/

Please look out for Lucky Leprechaun Giveaway Hop March 17th – 20th

March 10, 2011 Posted by | What's New | , , , | 1 Comment

Chinese New Year February 2011


Celebrating the Chinese New Year!

The Chinese New Year has a great history. In our past, people lived in an agricultural society and worked all year long. They only took a break after the harvest and before the planting of seeds. This happens to coincide with the beginning of the lunar New Year.

The Chinese New Year is very similar to the Western one, rich in traditions, folklores and rituals. It has been said that it is a combination of the Western Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year. This is hardly an exaggeration!

The origin of the Chinese New Year itself is centuries old – in fact, too old to actually be traced. It is popularly recognized as the Spring Festival and celebrations last 15 days.

Preparations tend to begin a month before the date of the Chinese New Year (similar to a Western Christmas). During this time people start buying presents, decoration materials, food and clothing. A huge clean-up gets underway days before the New Year, when Chinese houses are cleaned from top to bottom. This ritual is supposed to sweep away all traces of bad luck. Doors and windowpanes are often given a new coat of paint, usually red, then decorated with paper cuts and couplets with themes such as happiness, wealth and longevity printed on them.

To read more click http://www.theholidayspot.com/chinese_new_year/history.htm

Celebrate Chinese New Year with a feast of color!

Kids, get ready with your crayons. We have great pics that you can print and color! Click link http://www.theholidayspot.com/chinese_new_year/pics_to_color/

Children’s Chinese Folklore – Short Stories for Kids

The Golden Beetle or Why the Dog Hates the Cat by Norman Pitman

What we shall eat tomorrow, I haven’t the slightest idea!” said Widow Wang to her eldest son, as he started out one morning in search of work.

“Oh, the gods will provide. I’ll find a few coppers somewhere,” replied the boy, trying to speak cheerfully, although in his heart he also had not the slightest idea in which direction to turn.

The winter had been a hard one – extreme cold, deep snow, and violent winds. The Wang house had suffered greatly. The roof had fallen in, weighed down by heavy snow. Then a hurricane had blown a wall over, and Ming-li, the son, up all night and exposed to a bitter cold wind, had caught pneumonia. Long days of illness followed, with the spending of extra money for medicine. All their scant savings had soon melted away, and at the shop where Ming-li had been employed his place was filled by another. When at last he arose from his sick bed he was too weak for hard labor and there seemed to be no work in the neighboring villages for him to do. Night after night he came home, trying not to be discouraged, but in his heart feeling the deep pangs of sorrow that come to the good son who sees his mother suffering for want of food and clothing.

“Bless his good heart!” said the poor widow after he had gone. “No mother ever had a better boy. I hope he is right in saying the gods will provide. It has been getting so much worse these past few weeks that it seems now as if my stomach were as empty as a rich man’s brain. Why, even the rats have deserted our cottage, and there’s nothing left for poor Tabby, while old Blackfoot is nearly dead from starvation.”

When the old woman referred to the sorrows of her pets, her remarks were answered by a pitiful mewing and barking from the corner where the two unfed creatures were curled up together trying to keep warm.

Just then there was a loud knocking at the gate. When the widow Wang called out, “Come in!” she was surprised to see an old bald-headed priest standing in the doorway. “Sorry, but we have nothing,” she went on, feeling sure the visitor had come in search of food. “We have fed on scraps these two weeks – on scraps and scrapings – and now we are living on the memories of what we used to have when my son’s father was living. Our cat was so fat she couldn’t climb to the roof. Now look at her. You can hardly see her, she’s so thin. No, I’m sorry we can’t help you, friend priest, but you see how it is.”

For a full story click http://www.apples4theteacher.com/holidays/chinese-new-year/short-stories/why-dog-hates-cat.html

Chinese New Years Recommended Reading – Kids Books for Chinese New Year
The Runaway Wok: A Chinese New Year Tale

For a full list of books click http://www.apples4theteacher.com/holidays/chinese-new-year/kids-books/

January 28, 2011 Posted by | Mymcbooks | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

List of Children’s Chrsitmas Books for 2010


For a full list of Christmas Books visit http://astore.amazon.com/memchiboogif-20

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December 5, 2010 Posted by | Holiday Books For Children | , , , | Leave a comment

   

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