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2nd Classic Book Giveaway: The Prince and the Pauper. Ends Aug 17th


Mymcbooks welcomes you to the 3rd Annual Classic Reading for Kids Event August 1 – 31. You can win from a list of classic books every week by taking part in the Classic Reading for Kids Giveaway. This week we feature Mark Twain Classic – The Prince and the Pauper. Ends August 17th.

About the Author: Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[2] better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called “the Great American Novel.”

Twain grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, which provided the setting for Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer. After an apprenticeship with a printer, he worked as a typesetter and contributed articles to his older brother Orion’s newspaper. He later became a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River before heading west to join Orion in Nevada. He referred humorously to his singular lack of success at mining, turning to journalism for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. In 1865, his humorous story, “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” was published, based on a story he heard at Angels Hotel in Angels Camp California where he had spent some time as a miner. The short story brought international attention, even being translated to classic Greek. His wit and satire, in prose and in speech, earned praise from critics and peers, and he was a friend to presidents, artists, industrialists, and European royalty.

Though Twain earned a great deal of money from his writings and lectures, he invested in ventures that lost a great deal of money, notably the Paige Compositor, which failed because of its complexity and imprecision. In the wake of these financial setbacks he filed for protection from his creditors via a bankruptcy filing, and with the help of Henry Huttleston Rogers eventually overcame his financial troubles. Twain chose to pay all his pre-bankruptcy creditors in full, though he had no responsibility to do this under the law.

Twain was born shortly after a visit by Halley’s Comet, and he predicted that he would “go out with it,” too. He died the day following the comet’s subsequent return. He was lauded as the “greatest American humorist of his age,” and William Faulkner called Twain “the father of American literature.

The Prince and the Pauper

About the Book: The Prince and the Pauper is a novel by American author Mark Twain. It was first published in 1881 in Canada, before its 1882 publication in the United States. The novel represents Twain’s first attempt at historical fiction. Set in 1547, it tells the story of two young boys who are identical in appearance: Tom Canty, a pauper who lives with his abusive father in Offal Court off Pudding Lane in London, and Prince Edward, son of King Henry VIII.

Tom Canty (youngest son of a family living with the dregs of society in Offal Court) has always aspired to a better life, encouraged by the local priest (who has taught him to read and write). Loitering around the palace gates one day, he sees a prince (the Prince of Wales – Edward VI). Tom is nearly caught and beaten by the Royal Guards; however, Edward stops them and invites Tom into his palace chamber. There the two boys get to know one another, fascinated by each other’s life and their uncanny resemblance. They decide to switch clothes “temporarily”. Edward leaves in a hurry before the boys are caught at their game, snatching up an article of national importance (which the reader later learns is the Great Seal of England). Soon Prince Edward is trying to escape the brutality of Tom’s abusive, drunken father; Tom, posing as the prince, tries to cope with court customs and manners. His fellow nobles and palace staff think “the prince” has an illness which has caused memory loss, and fear he will go mad. They repeatedly ask him about the missing “Great Seal”, but he knows nothing about it. However, when Tom is asked to sit in on judgments his common-sense observations reassure them his mind is sound.

Edward soon meets Miles Hendon, a soldier and nobleman returning from war. Although Miles does not believe Edward’s claims to royalty, he humors him and becomes his protector. Meanwhile, news reaches them that King Henry VIII has died and Edward is now the king.

As Edward experiences the brutish life of a pauper firsthand, he becomes aware of the stark class inequality in England; in particular, he sees the harsh, punitive nature of the English judicial system when women are pilloried and flogged. He realizes that the accused are convicted on flimsy evidence (and branded – or hanged – for petty offenses), and vows to reign with mercy when he regains his rightful place. When Edward unwisely declares to a gang of thieves that he is the king and will put an end to unjust laws, they assume he is insane and hold a mock coronation.

Giveaway Rules


There will be 1 winner  

This Giveaway is Open to the USA Only!

Winner will be selected by

Giveaway Ends August 17th 

Comments like these would be deleted – Great contest, please enter me, Love to win this! This is so cute!

Mandatory: Leave a comment about the review below. Leaving a helpful comment relating to this book would be appreciated and valid to the giveaway.

Giveaway Guidelines and Disclaimer  

Winners are selected via Random and notified by email. You have 48 hours to respond;

If no response, the prize is forfeited and an alternate winner is chosen.

This giveaway has ended

Winner is #3 – Gwen

August 10, 2013 - Posted by | Classic Reading for Kids, Free Giveaways | , , , , , ,


  1. I love this story. It has such a great lesson to it. Truly a classic.

    Comment by lisa | August 10, 2013 | Reply

  2. Amazing about Halley’s Comet and Mark Twain. This is truly a Classic. Thank you for this opportunity.
    Carol L
    Lucky4750 (at) aol (dot) com

    Comment by Carol L | August 11, 2013 | Reply

  3. This is a classic I have been wanting to read. This edition would match some other classics that I own.

    Comment by Gwen | August 11, 2013 | Reply

  4. Love the “About the Author: Samuel Langhorne Clemens” it’s amazing that this classic is still in print and read.

    Comment by sherry butcher | August 11, 2013 | Reply

  5. Ok, this is terrible. I’ve never read this. Arghhhh. It’s one of the all too many classics I haven’t read, which is why I created a classics challenge on my blog and all year have been reading classics. I read Secret Garden and Jane Eyre and The Woman in White (secret garden was a reread) and am deciding what to read next. Maybe some Mark Twain is in order!?
    Great review and this is awesome! Come say hi sometime😀
    Dee @ Dee’s Reads

    Comment by diamondnazaneen | August 13, 2013 | Reply

  6. Truly a wonderful story. I have always enjoyed books by Twain. Thanks for the reminder about his thoughts about his death and Halley’s comet. I had forgotten all about that.

    Comment by Paula | August 14, 2013 | Reply

  7. i admire Mark Twain very much and have read several of his books. I look forward to finding out if Tom and Edward switch back their identities.

    Comment by Lily Kwan | August 17, 2013 | Reply

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