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Keepsake that Educates!

Black History Month 2014 Giveaway. Ends Feb 28th


Aunt Harriet

Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky by Faith Ringgold

Brother of the Knight

Brother of the Knight by Debbie Allen

Follow the Drinking Gourd

Follow the Drinking Gourd by Jeanette Winter

Henry Box Freedom

Henry’s Freedom Box by Ellen Levine

I Am Harriet Tubman

I am Harriet Tubman by Grace Norwich

I Survived

I Survived The Battle of Gettysburg, 1863 by Lauren Tarshis

Ron Big Mission

Ron’s Big Mission y Rose Blue and Corinne J Naden

Ruth and the Green Book

Ruth and the Green Book by Calvin Alexander Ramsey

The Prince of Fenway Park

The Prince of Fenway Park by Julianna Baggott

The Wedding Drama

Wedding Drama by Karen English

Talee Book

Talee and the Fallen Object by Jacquitta A McManus

Thank You Dr MLK

Thank You, Dr MLK, JR! By Eleanora E. Tate

Trouble Don't Last

Trouble don’t last by Shelly Pearsall

In keeping with the celebration of Black History Month, Mymcbooks is giveaway 4 books each to 2 lucky winner. Please list your 4 choices with your comment.

Giveaway Rules

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There will be 2 winners.

This Giveaway is Open to the USA Only!

Winner will be selected by Random.org

Giveaway Ends February, 28th

Comments like these would be deleted – Great contest, please enter me, Love to win this! This is so cute!

Mandatory: Leave a comment about the review below. Leaving a helpful comment relating to this book would be appreciated and valid to the giveaway.

Please HELP promote this book on your blog, twitter, pinterest or facebook. Thanks.

Giveaway Guidelines and Disclaimer  

Winners are selected via Random and notified by email. You have 48 hours to respond;

If no response, the prize is forfeited and an alternate winner is chosen.

This Giveaway Has Ended

Winners are #4 – Saba and #1 – MJ

February 1, 2014 Posted by | Black History Month, Free Giveaways | , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

Black History Month 2014 Theme – Black History Month: ‘Civil Rights in America’


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 Civil Rights in America, commemorating the 50th

Black History Month 2014 Theme – Black History Month: ‘Civil Rights in America’

Black History Month or National African American History Month is an annual celebration of and a time for recognizing achievements by black Americans in U.S. history. Americans have recognized Black History Month annually since 1926. Although blacks have been in America at least as far back as colonial times, it was not until the 20th century that they gained a respectable presence in history books.

carter-g-woodson

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who earned a doctorate degree from Harvard, was disturbed to find that history books largely ignored America’s black population. He decided to take on the challenge of writing black Americans into the nation’s history. In 1926, he launched Negro History Week. He chose February because it marks the birthdays of two men who greatly influenced the black American population, Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In the mid-1970s, it became Black History Month and ever since, every American president has issued proclamations endorsing Black History Month.

http://www.forthoodsentinel.com/story.php?id=12699

CGWoodson_roadside_marker

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carter_G._Woodson

February 1, 2014 Posted by | Black History Month | , , , , | 2 Comments

Black History Month 2013 Giveaway Part 2. Ends Feb 28th


The Ear

The year is 2174.  The place is Zimbabwe, Africa.  Three adventurous children escape their parents’ heavily guarded mansion to explore the dangerous world outside.  They soon learn how dangerous it really is.  Tendai, the oldest boy, is their leader, although he worries about being brave enough. Rita, his sister, is an expert at starting fights.  Kuda, his little brother, is willing to try anything. They are quickly enslaved in a plastic mine ruled by the terrifying She Elephant and her army of vlei people. Vlei people have been living in the dump so long they look like piles of trash.  The children flee them to find new perils.  They are pursued by the Ear, the Eye and the Arm, detectives hired by the children’s parents, who always seem to arrive too late. The worst danger of all lies at the top of the Mile High MacIlwaine, a hotel so tall that it sways like a tree in the wind.  For up there are not merely humans, but spirits whose aim is to devour the souls of Zimbabwe.

The Scrapyard

The Scrapyard Detectives. The Scrapyard Detectives are on the case! Join Robert, Jinn and Raymond as they solve the mysteries that affect their community, and learn valuable lessons about teamwork and diversity.

Separate, but Not Equal

A moving history of the struggle of African-Americans for equal education rights from colonial times to the present.

Giveaway (US ONLY)

There will be ONLY 1 Winner

Giveaway Ends February 28th

The winner will be selected via Random.org

This Giveaway Has Ended

Winner is #5 – Lily K

February 14, 2013 Posted by | Black History Month, Free Giveaways | , , , , | 1 Comment

Book Spotlight/Giveaway: World of Ink Tour for Author Alyce Joy Rininger. Ends Sept 16th


About the Author: Alyce Joy was blessed with four children for whom she composed bedtime verses every night. That inspired her to publish a children’s book of prayers, entitled, “Priceless Gems.” When her children were grown, she began to write stories for her grandchildren.

Always fascinated with arts and crafts, she taught herself the art of pyrography. This fired her imagination, and she started burning life-sized pictures of wildlife onto all the doors of her home. Her wood burnings are scattered through the U.S. and Canada.

After deciding to put away her burning tools and torches, she enrolled in, and graduated from the Institute of Children’s Literature.
Alyce Joy hopes every child who reads her stories will look forward to each new adventure, as her favorite fairy becomes entangled into many, outrageous happenstances.

Follow Alyce Joy at website http://alycejoy.com

Publisher http://www.halopublishing.com/bookstore/Ka-Boom

You can find out more about Alyce Joy’s World of Ink Author/Book Tour at http://tinyurl.com/8q5vw74

To learn more about the World of Ink Tours visit http://worldofinknetwork.com

About the Book: Sprout is a fairy from Spritesville, Ohio. Her given name is Sprunetta Brunetta. She doesn’t like it, because she thinks it sounds too much like somebody’s wicked sister. Since she is only four inches tall, all her friends call her Sprout. This little fairy is in the service of her queen, the beloved Splaminda Herminda, who rules Spritesville.

The queen sends Sprout to different places to do whatever job needs done. Sprout is not a perfect fairy. She has a wild shoe fetish, and is always getting into some kind of trouble. Queen Splaminda realizes Sprout’s problems, but feels the fairy will grow out of her awkwardness, as she matures. Somehow, Sprout always manages to save the good and meek from the scary and sometimes bad…but… occasionally, she needs a little help.

To say the least, it was an explosive meeting between Taylor and Sprout. Taylor’s dollhouse blows up and her wary investigation finds Sprout among its wreckage. The little girl obviously thinks Sprout is a bad, fibbin’ fairy and the fun is about to begin.

Get a sneak peek of the book at http://youtu.be/Hq9sfmzH0-w
Available wherever books are sold and online.

Giveaway

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

This Giveaway is Open to the US ONLY.

Winner selected by Random.org to win a copy

Giveaway Ends September 16th, 2012.

Mandatory: Please leave your comment about the author, book and your email address in the comment field below.

Comments without email address will be deleted.

 

World of Ink Schedule for Author Alyce Joy

Follow this tour to its next stops.

August 31st
Families Matter – Book Review/Giveaway
http://familiesmatter2us.blogspot.com

September 3rd
MomnBaby Network – Book Review/Giveaway
http://momnbaby.com/blogs

September 4th
4 the LOVE of BOOKS – Book Review
http://myheartbelongs2books.blogspot.com/

September 5th
The New Book Review
http://www.TheNewBookReview.blogspot.com

 

 This Giveaway Has Ended!

 

Winner is #1 – Lacey

 

 

 

 

August 31, 2012 Posted by | Blog Tour, Free Giveaways | , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

Black History Month 2012 Giveaway Part 2. Ends Feb 29th


In keeping with the celebration of Black History Month, Mymcbooks is giveaway four books to 1 lucky winner. 

 

Metal Man by Aaron Reynolds

Sparksliterally fly asDevonmakes the leap from observer to creator. With the help of the Metal Man, canDevonweld a sculpture of his own, or will the scrap metal amount to a pile of junk as his Mom suspects? The unique voice and gritty illustrations capture the urban atmosphere and the heat of the welder’s torch.

Oni’s Good Hair Day

Oni was very excited about going to the Alphabet Kids Afterschool Center for the first time, But when Allegra hurt her feelings, she did not want to go back. What happens the next day? Find out what happens in Oni’s Good Hair Day

 

Home Now by Lesley Beake

Sieta remembers a happy home far away over the mountains, but now she is living with her Aunty in a place she must call Home Now. Her new home is a busy, friendly place but Sieta can’t seem to smile. One day she meets an orphaned baby elephant at the elephant park, Sieta begins to see things in a different light. This book includes a note about the plight of millions of African children who, just like Sieta, have lost their parents to the AIDS epidemic.

The Dream and the Struggle: Separate but not Equal by Jim Haskins

A moving history of the struggle of African-Americans for equal education rights from colonial times to the present, from the award-winning author of over eighty nonfiction books for young readers.

Giveaway (USA Resident Only)

Must be a follower of this blog or twitter to enter this giveaway.

Winner will be selected via Random.org. Ends February 29th.

Mandatory Entry: Follow this blog by clicking on ‘Follow Blog’ and leave your comments and email address for shipping contact. No email No contact.

To enter please fill out the form below.

Entries – 12

 

This Giveaway Has Ended!

 

Winner is #8 – Kelly L

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month, Free Giveaways | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Winner of the Black History Month 2012 Giveaway Part 1.


Congratulations to the following winners.

The Winners were selected using Random.org 

#15 – Melissa  L is the Winner of Black History Month 2012 Giveaway

Thanks to all those who took part in this giveaways.

Winners has been notified.

http://mymcbooks.wordpress.com/category/giveaway-winners/

February 14, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month, Giveaway Winners | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Black History Month: Great African-American Fiction: Grades 3-5


Compelling characters and interesting tales are perfect reads for Black History Month or any time of year.

Abby Takes a Stand

by Patricia McKissack

Gee recalls for her grandchildren what happened in 1960 in Nashville, Tennessee, when she, aged ten, passed out flyers while her cousin and other adults held sit-ins at restaurants and lunch counters to…

Scraps of Time series: book 1

Circle of Gold

by Candy Dawson Boyd

Mattie is determined to get her mother a beautiful gold pin for Mother’s Day, even though she has not saved enough money and has just lost her job.

Freedom Crossing

by Margaret Goff Clark

A young Southern girl finds her loyalties challenged when she returns to her home in the North and discovers her father and brother have been helping runaway slaves.

Gloria’s Way

by Ann Cameron

This delightful collection of short stories centers on Gloria’s adventures with her friends Julian, Huey, and Latisha. Parrots, squirrels, and fractions plague Gloria and her friends, but Gloria finds…

Koya Delaney and the Good Girl Blues

by Eloise Greenfield

Koya Delaney, an eleven-year-old African-American girl, has trouble expressing anger until her cousin, a popular male singer, comes to town.

More Than Anything Else

by Marie Bradby

Nine-year-old Booker works with his father and brother at the saltworks but dreams of the day when he’ll be able to read.

http://www.scholastic.com/resources/booklist/great-african-american-fiction-grades-3-5/?eml=/PNL/e/20120203//txtl/Elementary_Control//compelling_characters////&ym_MID=1396261&ym_rid=6903567

February 4, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month | , , , , , | 1 Comment

Black History Month 2012: History of Black Education


Washington and DuBois

Immediately following the Civil War, African Americans were faced with great discrimination and suffering. The newly free slaves were faced with the dilemma of carving a niche in a society that once regarded them as nothing more than property. During this period, two figures emerged as the preeminent leaders of two different philosophical camps. Booker T. Washington of Virginiaand William Edward Burghardt DuBois of Massachusetts, held two very different proposals regarding the best way for African Americans to improve their situations. While their methods may have differed, both of these remarkable men had a common goal in the uplift of the black community.

Born in Franklin County, Virginia in the mid-1850s, Booker T. Washington spent his early childhood in slavery. Following emancipation, Washington (like many Blacks) felt that a formalized education was the best way to improve his living standards. Due to social segregation, the availability of education for blacks in was fairly limited. In response, Washington traveled to Hampton Institute where he undertook industrial education. At Hampton, his studies focused on the acquisition of industrial or practical working skills as opposed to the liberal arts. Because of his experiences at Hampton, Washington went on to become an educator as well as an adamant supporter of industrial education, ultimately founding the Tuskegee Normal and Agricultural Institute. Washington felt that the best way for blacks to stabilize their future was to make themselves an indispensable faction of society by providing a necessity. “The individual who can do something that the world wants done will, in the end, make his way regardless of his race” (Washington 155).

As a Southerner himself,Washington was familiar with the needs of southern blacks as well as the treatment that they received.Washington stressed that Blacks should stop agitating for voting and civil rights not only in exchange for economic gains and security, but also for reduced anti-black violence. As such, his philosophies were more popular amongst southern blacks than northern blacks.Washington also garnered a large following from both northern and southern whites. Northern whites appreciated his efforts in a time when they were growing increasingly weary of the race problem; one that they associated with the South. Southern whites appreciated his efforts, because they perceived them as a complete surrender to segregation and self-uplift.

http://www2.kenyon.edu/Depts/Amerstud/blackhistoryatkenyon/Individual%20Pages/Washington%20and%20DuBois.htm

http://www2.kenyon.edu/Depts/Amerstud/blackhistoryatkenyon/Individual%20Pages/History%20of%20Black%20Education.htm

February 3, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month | , , | 1 Comment

Mymcbooks Talks About Education: Beginnings of Black Education


Very few black Virginians received any education at all until public schools were established during Reconstruction. Public schools in Virginia were segregated from the outset, apparently without much thought or debate, on the widely-held assumption that such an arrangement would reduce conflict. Of course, public schools were segregated in many other states, both North and South.

When public schools were a novelty, most black Virginians were thrilled to have any free education at all. Moreover, they liked having schools of their own, not subject to white interference, in which black children would feel comfortable and not be taunted with racial epithets.

These schools, however, were at the mercy of the white-controlled state government for funding. Many whites did not want blacks to become educated, fearing they would challenge white supremacy and not be content with jobs working in the fields or in domestic service. Black schools therefore received far less financial support than did white schools. Black schools had fewer books, worse buildings, and less well paid teachers. Ramshackle, segregated schools marked black Virginians with a stigma of inferiority and the status of second-class citizenship that they would have to endure throughout their lives. http://www.vahistorical.org/civilrights/education.htm

 

Early 20th century group portrait

  Early 20th century group portrait
The Virginia Constitution of 1870 mandated a system of public education for the first time, but the newly established schools were operated on a segregated basis. Despite social and economic challenges, African Americans pursued education with great fervor. Courtesy Valentine Richmond History Center, Cook Collection.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Interior, African American schoolhouse

  Interior, African American schoolhouse
In this typical southern classroom of the early 1900s, barefoot children work under the supervision of a single teacher, who taught all subjects, ages, and grades. Courtesy Library of Congress.
Click to see a larger image    

  

African American school, Halifax County

  African American school, Halifax County
Both the state and local governments supported the public school system, but black schools were chronically underfunded. Compare this primitive, wooden African American school in South Boston, Virginia, to the nearby photographs of white schools in South Boston from the same time period, the 1920s and 1930s. Courtesy Library of Congress.
Click to see a larger image    

  

African American school, Halifax County

  African American school, Halifax County
School attendance, particularly in rural areas, tended to be erratic, and Virginia had one of the lowest rates of attendance in the nation in the years before World War II. Black schools, however, were so underfunded that most of them were overcrowded. In 1900 the average black school had 37 percent more pupils in attendance than the average white school. Shown here is a black school in South Boston, Virginia, in the 1920s or 1930s. Courtesy Library of Congress.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Elementary school for whites, Halifax County

  Elementary school for whites, Halifax County
In the 1937–38 school year, about the time of this photo of a white elementary school in South Boston, Halifax County had eight brick, stone, or concrete schools for whites but only two similar buildings for blacks. Courtesy Library of Congress.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Elementary school for whites, Halifax County

  Elementary school for whites, Halifax County
In 1937–38, in Halifax County, the total value of white school property was $561,262, contrasted to only $176,881 for the county’s black schools. Shown here is a white elementary school in South Boston. Courtesy Library of Congress.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Virginia Randolph Cottage, Henrico County
Click to see a larger image

  Virginia Randolph Cottage, Henrico County
In 1908, Henrico County Training School instructor Virginia Estelle Randolph became the nation’s first Jeanes Supervising Industrial Teacher. Anna Jeanes, a wealthy Philadelphia Quaker, established a fund to employ black “supervisors” to upgrade vocational training in black public schools in the South. This was a natural extension of the educational philosophy Randolph herself had developed, which followed the precepts of Booker T. Washington, emphasizing job training and home economics. Shown here is the 1939 cottage in which Miss Randolph taught home economics and which she used as an office. It is a now a national historic landmark. Courtesy Department of Historic Resources.

  

St. Paul's Chapel School, Brunswick County
Click to see a larger image

  St. Paul’s Chapel School, Brunswick County
Julius Rosenwald, an early partner in Sears, Roebuck & Company, and later its president, met with Booker T. Washington in May 1911 and then established a fund to improve the education of southern blacks by building schools. Rosenwald specified the size and height of rooms, the placement of desks and blackboards, and even the paint colors. Large banks of windows characterize the so-called Rosenwald schools, of which 5,357 were built in the South by the time of his death in 1932. His $4,400,000 contribution was matched by $18,000,000 in state and local government funds, $1,200,000 from other foundations, and $4,700,000 from the African American community itself. Shown here is St. Paul’s Chapel School in Brunswick County, the only one-room school of the thirteen Rosenwald schools constructed in that county. Courtesy Department of Historic Resources.

  

Doswell Elementary School, Hanover County

  Doswell Elementary School, Hanover County
Doswell Elementary School for African Americans in Hanover County as it appeared in 1955. Courtesy Martha Moore.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Holley Graded School, Northumberland County

  Holley Graded School, Northumberland County
Holley Graded School, an African American school in Northumberland County, was built 1914–17 on the site of the original school founded by Sallie Holley of New York in 1869. The current four-room structure is on a two-acre tract. The school is being conserved to serve as a museum and adult-education facility. Courtesy Department of Historic Resources.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Harrison High School, Roanoke

  Harrison High School, Roanoke
In 1916 the Roanoke School Board authorized the construction of Harrison High School. “Public high schools for Negroes were then few and not yet welcomed with much enthusiasm by the white public,” wrote J. L. Blair Buck. Prior to the school’s completion, black students seeking secondary education had to travel to Virginia State College in Petersburg. Plans are underway to convert the building into a multi-use community center with apartment units. Courtesy Department of Historic Resources.
Click to see a larger image    

  

Riverhill School, Grayson County

  Riverhill School, Grayson County
In 1951, the humble, one-room, segregated Riverhill School in Grayson County served African American students from the first through seventh grades. Here, with their teacher, Mrs. Emma D. McCray, pupils walk down to meet the county bookmobile, also offered on a segregated basis. Courtesy Library of Virginia.

February 2, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month | , , | Leave a comment

Black History Month 2012 Giveaway Part 1. Ends Feb 14th


In keeping with the celebration of Black History Month, Mymcbooks will feature 2 set of Giveaways for Black History Month. The 1st of February and the 15th of February. There will be 1 winner taking home four books.

The Golden Pathway by Donna M. McDine

Raised in a hostile environment where abuse occurs daily, David attempts to break the mold and befriends the slave, Jenkins, owned by his Pa. Fighting against extraordinary times and beliefs, David leads Jenkins to freedom with no regard for his own safety and possible consequences dealt out by his Pa. To read the review click http://mymcbooks.wordpress.com/2011/05/13/book-review-the-golden-pathway-by-donna-m-mcdine/#comments

 

Priscilla and the Hollyhocks by Anne Broyles

Priscilla is a slave in the Big House. The hollyhocks her mother planted by the cow pond are all Priscilla has left to remember her by. When Master dies, Priscilla is sold to a Cherokee family. Another plantation, same life. Based on a true story, Priscilla and the Hollyhocks follows Priscilla from her early years on a Southern plantation to her forced march along the Trail of Tears to the chance encounter that leads to her freedom. On her journey from slave to free woman, Priscilla carries something precious with her: hollyhock seeds… and hope. To read the review click http://mymcbooks.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/book-review-and-giveaway-priscilla-and-the-hollyhocks-ends-february-2012/#comments

 

The Soul of a Butterfly by Tia Capers

A beautiful collection of affectionate, serene, joyous, motivational, and lively poems created especially for you. Signed copy by the author!

Somewhere in the Darkness by Walter Dean Myers

Jimmy hasn’t seen his father in nine years. But one day he comes back — on the run from the law. Together, the two of them travel across the country — where Jimmy’s dad will find the man who can exonerate him of the crime for which he was convicted. Along the way, Jimmy discovers a lot about his father and himself — and that while things can’t always be fixed, sometimes they can be understood and forgiven.

A teenage boy accompanies his father, who has recently escaped from prison, on a trip that turns out to be an, often painful, time of discovery for them both.

Giveaway (USA Resident Only)

Must be a follower of this blog or twitter to enter this giveaway.

Winner will be selected via Random.org. Ends February 14th.

Mandatory Entry: Follow this blog by clicking on ‘Follow Blog’ and leave your comments and email address for shipping contact. No email No contact.

To enter please fill out the form below.

 

Entries – 24

 

This Giveaway Has Ended!

 

Winner is #15 – Melissa L

February 1, 2012 Posted by | Black History Month, Free Giveaways | , , , , , | 4 Comments

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