Mymcbooks's Blog

Keepsake that Educates!

3rd Annual Classic Reading for Kids Event August 1 – 31


Mymcbooks welcomes you to the 3rd Annual Classic Reading for Kids Event August 1 – 31. You can win from a list of classic books every week by taking part in the Classic Reading for Kids Giveaway. This week we feature Jules Verne Classic – Around the World in Eighty Days. Ends August 10th.

1332459775_jules%20verne

About the Author: Jules Gabriel Verne (French: [ʒyl vɛʁn]; 8 February 1828 – 24 March 1905) was a French novelist, poet, and playwright best known for his adventure novels and his profound influence on the literary genre of science fiction.

Born to bourgeois parents in the seaport of Nantes, Verne was trained to follow in his father’s footsteps as a lawyer, but quit the profession early in life to write for magazines and the stage. His collaboration with the publisher Pierre-Jules Hetzel led to the creation of the Voyages Extraordinaires, a widely popular series of scrupulously researched adventure novels including Journey to the Center of the Earth, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, and Around the World in Eighty Days.

Verne is generally considered a major literary author in France and most of Europe, where he has had a wide influence on the literary avant-garde and on surrealism. His reputation is markedly different in Anglophone regions, where he has often been labeled a writer of genre fiction or children’s books, not least because of the highly abridged and altered translations in which his novels are often reprinted.

Verne is the second most translated author in the world (following Agatha Christie), and his works appear in more translations per year than those of any other writer. Verne is one writer sometimes called “The Father of Science Fiction,” as are H. G. Wells and Hugo Gernsback  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jules_Verne

Around the World

About the Book: Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published in 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager (roughly £1,324,289 today) set by his friends at the Reform Club. It is one of Verne’s most acclaimed works.

The story starts in London on Tuesday, October 1, 1872. Fogg is a rich English gentleman and bachelor living in solitude at Number 7 Savile Row, Burlington Gardens. Despite his wealth, which is £40,000 (roughly £2,650,000 today), Fogg, whose countenance is described as “repose in action”, lives a modest life with habits carried out with mathematical precision. Very little can be said about his social life other than that he is a member of the Reform Club. Having dismissed his former valet, James Foster, for bringing him shaving water at 84 °F (29 °C) instead of 86 °F (30 °C), Fogg hires a Frenchman by the name of Jean Passepartout, who is about 30 years old, as a replacement.

Later on that day, in the Reform Club, Fogg gets involved in an argument over an article in The Daily Telegraph, stating that with the opening of a new railway section in India, it is now possible to travel around the world in 80 days. He accepts a wager for £20,000 (roughly £1,320,000 today) from his fellow club members, which he will receive if he makes it around the world in 80 days. Accompanied by Passepartout, he leaves London by train at 8:45 P.M. on Wednesday, October 2, 1872, and thus is due back at the Reform Club at the same time 80 days later, Saturday, December 21, 1872.

The itinerary

London, United Kingdom to Suez, Egypt rail   and steamer across the Mediterranean Sea 7   days
Suez to Bombay, India steamer   across the Red   Sea and the Indian Ocean 13   days
Bombay to Calcutta,   India rail 3   days
Calcutta to Victoria, Hong Kong steamer   across the South China Sea 13   days
Hong Kong to Yokohama, Japan steamer   across the South China Sea, East   China Sea, and the Pacific Ocean 6   days
Yokohama to San  Francisco, United States steamer   across the Pacific Ocean 22   days
San Francisco to New York City, United States rail 7   days
New York to London steamer   across the Atlantic Ocean and rail 9   days
Total 80   days

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Around_the_World_in_Eighty_Days

Giveaway Rules

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There will be 1 winner  

This Giveaway is Open to the USA Only!

Winner will be selected by Random.org

Giveaway Ends August 10th 

Comments like these would be deleted – Great contest, please enter me, Love to win this! This is so cute!

Mandatory: Leave a comment about the review below. Leaving a helpful comment relating to this book would be appreciated and valid to the giveaway.

Giveaway Guidelines and Disclaimer  

Winners are selected via Random and notified by email. You have 48 hours to respond;

If no response, the prize is forfeited and an alternate winner is chosen.

Giveaway Winner #1 – Lisa

July 31, 2013 - Posted by | Classic Reading for Kids, Free Giveaways | , , ,

9 Comments »

  1. This is such a classic! My son would love it; right now he is reading 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Terrific stories to share!

    Comment by lisa | July 31, 2013 | Reply

  2. Great classic author! I love the classics and am always trying to expose my children to them in all art forms, literature, movies, music, art. There are so many great things we can learn from the classics.
    Mel
    bournmelissa at hotmail dot com

    Comment by Mel Bourn (@MelCamino5) | July 31, 2013 | Reply

  3. I have never read Around the World in 80 Days. I was not exposed to the classics and wish I had been. I am now an avid believer in the Classics and am reading through them now. As a fifth grade teacher and a mom of three kids, this is one of the books on the top of my list and I would love to have a copy to read with them. Most of all, thank you for encouraging the classics in a time when they are being forgotten.

    Comment by Carrie | July 31, 2013 | Reply

  4. My neighbor and I were just talking about reading the classics – I am working through Jane Austen and she is reading Jules Verne. I have added him to my list of authors to read – what interested me was how he was ahead of his time in thinking up what men can achieve through travel.

    Comment by Teresa Young | August 1, 2013 | Reply

  5. I absolutely love classic books! I would love to add this one to my collection! I have heard so many good reviews about this and knowing the author I would not think anything less than “a wonderful read” for this book.

    Comment by Damini M | August 4, 2013 | Reply

  6. My 14 year old daughter has been a fan of reading since she started. One of her favorite authors is in fact Jules Verne. 20,000 Leagues is currently her favorite but she has not gotten the chance to read this one yet. She talks about it and knows a lot about it but hasn’t gotten her hands on it just yet. I would like to start reading him as well, if I can just find some reading time! :)

    Comment by Samantha Daleo | August 5, 2013 | Reply

  7. I’ve never read this book, but your review definitely put it on my list as I’m trying to branch out into more of the classics!

    Comment by Dawn S. | August 6, 2013 | Reply

  8. This is one of my favorite books. I enjoyed reading about Phileas Fogg and Jean Passepartout’s exciting adventures racing to win the wager of a lifetime.

    Comment by Lily Kwan | August 10, 2013 | Reply

  9. I have not read this in years. I like Jules Verne and also H G. Wells.

    Comment by mnleona | August 13, 2013 | Reply


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,579 other followers

%d bloggers like this: